Looking for Something?
Posts Tagged for

neuralgia

Melbourne Leader story, Soula bares soul over pain

Author:

The following story was published in support of the current National campaign: Nerve Pain is Different. Please help us raise awareness for those with debilitating invisible pain.

If you think you have nerve pain, talk to your doctor and visit www.nervepain.com.au. Complete the online questionnaire intended to help you explain your pain and take a printout to discuss with your doctor.

Melbourne Leader Mon 1 Dec

Resident shares story of coping with daily agony following fit ball accident

By Nic Price for the Melbourne Leader

SOULA Mantalvanos’ life was up-ended in 2007 when a fit ball she was sitting on burst and she dropped to the concrete floor.

She didn’t think much of it at the time and tried to continue her routine of yoga four times a week and regular walks, but that soon became impossible.

Dealing with chronic pain that made her feel like her “finger was stuck in a power point”, the Collingwood resident was not diagnosed until four-and-a-half years later with severe pudendal neuralgia nerve pain.

As she embarked on a journey of living with pain, Ms Mantalvanos and her husband turned their lives upside down in an attempt to find a better quality of life.

They closed their graphic design studio down (Ms Mantalvanos now works part- time) and even removed doors in their house so she wouldn’t have to open and close them.

“I’ve learned not to lift more than a few kilos, to sit a lot, get in the car a lot,” Ms Mantalvanos said. Continue Reading

John Quintner

Author:

John QuintnerI’ve made some great friends in cyber space throughout this PN pain journey (and developed quite a library along the way!). One friend I consider a favorite is John Quintner. He’s one of my most reliable sources when I need an honest opinion. We bump into each other over two main mutual ‘interests’: the (primitive) WorkCover assessment methods, and pain definitions. John doesn’t just know what he’s talking about, he’s upfront, honest and calls it how he sees it. And when someone has these credentials, I’m all ears, not to mention I become much wiser!

John doesn’t have a website but he’s on facebook and you can find him around the social media pain traps. His publications and efforts within the pain world have been a plenty and although all of the following info isn’t specifically related to PN or PNE, I felt it was very relevant for readers. And yes, you do recall correctly that I had published, John Quintner’s Personal injury compensation: lessons from Talmudic law on my website a while back.

So without further ado, I present my friend, the great John Quintner and his incredible opinions:

John’s interest in pain was aroused in the mid-1980s when he had to try to make sense of what was then known as “RSI”. In collaboration with the late Robert Elvey, physiotherapist, he published an hypothesis, which has stood the test of time. He also published his work on “whiplash”. Since then, together with fellow rheumatologist Professor Milton Cohen, he has published extensively in the field of Pain Medicine. They have tackled such controversial topics as Fibromyalgia, Myofascial Pain Syndrome, as well as exploring the concepts of stigma, stereotyping and empathy in the context of chronic pain patients. Together with Dr Pamela Lyon, they have published a comprehensive hypothesis for Chronic Widespread Pain (Fibromyalgia). Their most recent paper addresses the question “Is Chronic Pain a Disease?”.

John’s publications:

An Evol Stress-Response Hypothesis for CWP. pdf
A book chapter from At the Edge of being: The Aporia of Pain. Published in 2012 by Interdisciplinary Press, Oxford. Editors: Heather McKenzie, John Quintner, Gillian Bendelow.pdf
Butler Medically Unexplained Symptoms pdf
Consumers in remote areas pdf
A critical evaluation of the trigger point phenomenon pdf
Drugs for Fibromyalgia: How Good Are They? National Pain Report website.
Evolution, Stress and Fibromyalgia pdf
Exploring the underpinnings of research pdf
Fibromyalgia falls foul of a fallacy pdf
Fibromyalgia Syndrome- a problem of tautology pdf
From Neuralgia to Peripheral Neuropathic Pain pdf
Is chronic pain a disease? pdf
journal.pone pdf
La Doulou Provencal Word For Pain by John Quintner & Melanie Galbraith
Maldynia as moral judgment pdf
Painful cervical radiculopathy pdf
Pain Med Models pdf
Preclinic group education pdf
Referred pain of peripheral nerve origin pdf
Signification & Pain pdf
Stretch-induced cervicobrachial pain syndrome pdf
System plasticity and integrated care pdf
The Australian RSI debate- stereotyping and medicine pdf
The Challenge of Validating the Experience of Chronic Pain pdf
The horse is dead pdf
The medically unexplained revisited pdf
The RSI syndrome in historical perspective pdf
This Train is Bound for… Wholeville: A Travel Guide for the Perplexed pdf
Whiplash study pdf

Save

Save

Subject: Fair Assessment for Compensation?

Author:

For those subscribed to this Fair Assessment For Compensation post, I have had a reply and it is posted here!

AN OPEN LETTER TO WORKSAFE AUSTRALIA

(CC’d The Hon Gordon Rich-Philips)

SUBJECT: FAIR ASSESSMENT FOR COMPENSATION?

My name is Soula Mantalvanos and I am an injured Australian worker ever since an unfortunate incident in March 2006 where the fitball I was sitting on burst and I fell on to concrete. I was diagnosed after 4.5 years, with a painful condition that is often misunderstood; it is Pudendal Neuralgia (specifically Pelvic Chronic Pain).

MedicalPanels

Obviously you will be able to imagine the difficulties I have had in the WorkCover system with such an injury. Six years down the track, at the age of 43, I am left without weekly payments and an impairment score of 0%. I seriously question whether I’ve ever been assessed fairly.

In the Preamble of the National Workers’ Compensation Action Plan 2010-2013, a paragraph (b) recommends providing “fair” compensation for work-related injury, illness and death. As far as I can ascertain, “fair” means “marked by impartiality and honesty, as well as free from self-interest, prejudice, or favouritism.” Does this definition coincide with that intended by WorkSafe Australia? Continue Reading

Resources I have found

Author:

File downloads and links
Physiotherapy management of pelvic pain and sexual dysfunction: Clinical Application. Pdf 3.2mb
Anal Pain Caused by Entrapment of Nervus Pudendu, Ahmed Shafik. Pdf 150kb
Transperineal Pudendal Nerve Decompression, Jacques Beco M.D. Pdf 180kb
How can we win the war against pudendal neuropathy? Jacques Beco M.D. Pdf 1mb
Complex Pelvic Pain Syndromes, Charles W. Butrick, M,D. Pdf. 1.5mb
Pudendal neuralgia, a severe pain syndrome, Benson JT, Griffis K. PubMed.gov link to extract
Chronic Pelvic Pain, Dharmesh Kapoor. Medscape link
Management of Chronic Pelvic Pain, James E. Carter. Obgyn.net link
New Method for the Treatment of Pudendal Neuralgia, E. Bautrant, E. de Bisschop, V. Vaini-Elies, J. Massonnat, Aleman, J. Buntinx, J. de Vlieger, M. Di Constanzo, L. Habib, G. Patroni, S. Siboni, B. Ceas, V.,Schiby, M. Uglione-Ceas. Pdf 330kb
The urogenital and rectal pain syndromes, Ursula Wesselmann. Elsevier link to extract

Website links
The International Pudendal Neuropathy Association website link
Jacques Beco M.D. website link
Stanley J. Antolak, Jr. M.D.  Center for Urologic and Pelvic Pain (CUPP) website link
The Pudendal Nerve website link (this is a huge resource)
International Continence Society and International urogynecological Association meeting Toronto (Aug 2010) webcast
Women’s Health & Research Institute of Australia website link
Medifocus, Peripheral Neuropathy page link
Pelvic pain help website link
Health Organization for Pudendal Education (HOPE) website link
The Pacific Center for Pelvic Pain and Dysfunction, Jerome M. Weiss. website link

Video links
Transperineal Pudendal Nerve Decompression You Tube video link (if you can tolerate it!)
Pudendal Neuralgia, Dr Eric Bautrant (part 1), You Tube video sound file link
Pudendal Nerve Entrapment 3d demonstrational You Tube video link
Interview Prof. Thierry Vancaillie Assoc. Prof. of Gynaecology. NSW You Tube video link (Part1)
Prof. Thierry Vancaillie Assoc. Prof. of Gynaecology. NSW You Tube video link

Women’s Health and Research Institute of Australia (WHRIA)

Author:
The following information is from the Women’s Health and Research Institute of Australia (WHRIA) website:

From Discovery, And Research Innovation To Reality

Pudendal Neuralgia: Pelvic & Perineal Pain

Associated with the Pelvic Nerve

Your symptoms & history indicate that the nerve in the pelvis, the pudendal nerve, may be responsible for all or some of your pain and other symptoms. The pudendal nerve runs from the lower back, then passes between 2 ligaments, then runs along the top of the pelvic floor muscles, then through to the base of the pelvis the pelvis and out to the perineum. Adjacent to the ligaments are muscles: the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) at the front and the obturator and piriformis at the back.

What is Pudendal Nerve Pain (Pudendal Neuralgia)?

Pudendal nerve pain may be associated with either irritation of a branch of the nerve, or with compression of the pudendal nerve itself by fibrosis of the surrounding tissues or the bulky PFM or tight ligaments. The symptoms of this problem are mainly expressed by pain (burning, electric shock like, raw feeling etc.) in the vagina, penis, scrotum, perineum, anus and pelvis and difficulty sitting for prolonged periods of time. Pudendal Nerve Pain may be related to childbirth, vaginal surgery, cycling, excessive abdominal & pelvic exercise, past pelvic/perineal trauma and straining or it may have no obvious cause. You may also have associated bladder, bowel or sexual problems.

What can be done about this?

You will be assessed by a doctor and physiotherapist to determine whether your pudendal nerves and pelvic floor muscles indicate that pudendal neuralgia is a possibility.

You may have a pudendal nerve block performed as a diagnostic procedure; local anaesthetic is injected into the canal through which the nerve travels.

You may be prescribed some medications to clam down nerve pain.

Early treatments aim to relax the pelvic floor muscles and decrease the pressure on the nerve. You will also be advised not to strain especially during defaecation & voiding. If appropriate you will also be given bowel & bladder management strategies. You may also need to manage painful trigger points in the PFM. You may be suitable for trigger point injections or Botox injections into the PFM if deemed appropriate.

Sitting: The aim is to avoid pressure on the entire perineum from the pubic bone to the tail bone (coccyx).Try sitting on 2 rolled towels or a cut up pool noodle. Clarke Rubber have “stadium seats” which can be cut into an appropriate shape.

What should you NOT do?

Prolonged sitting; straining; cycling (stationary, road, racing); rowing; abdominal strengthening exercises such as sit-ups, Pilates & intense core stability work; high level dance classes; heavy weight lifting; any other high level intense training which causes marked abdominal strengthening; pelvic floor muscle strengthening exercises. You will be taught how to RELAX & maybe stretch your PFM by the physiotherapist.

What can you do?

If you are able & inclined: general cardio work such as walking, swimming (not breast stroke), gentle running, soft sand running, light weights, gentle exercise classes, yoga (stretching & gentle toning not high level strengthening). If any of these activities flares your pain please cease & discuss with the physiotherapist…

Here are some quick links to the website’s resources.

Enter your address to receive posts via email

Definitions of pain

What is Pudendal Neuralgia (PN)?
Most simply put PN is Carpal Tunnel in the pelvis/buttocks. Compression of the Pudendal Nerve occurs after trauma to the pelvis and is aggravated with pressure. The pain is often described as a toothache like pain, with spasms, sensations of tingling, numbness, or burning. It can be very debilitating.

What is Neuropathic pain?
Neuropathic pain is the result of an injury or malfunction in the peripheral or central nervous system. The pain is often triggered by an injury, but this injury may or may not involve actual damage to the nervous system. More…

Pain Train my online health record

Imagine your specialist knew this much before your first appointment…

Pain Train my online health record

Save

Save

Save

Save

Order my book $31 (inc. postage)

Archives