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Italian lifestyle, perfecto for Pudendal Neuralgia

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Roman style Anti burst fitball (Image: Now this is what I would call an anti-burst fitball!)

I’ve just come back from Italy. I lived a dream, that’s exactly how it felt. I lived it with my husband Theo. Without him, clearly I would not have been going much further than the Italian restaurant up the road, but aside from the obvious, seems like Italy was a great destination choice.

Obviously there had to be some turning point in my Pudendal Neuralgia (PN) life if I was ever able to think about travelling again and the turning point for me was my stimulation implant.

Just as my senses returned, my dreams did too and my dreams always include travel. That’s what we did every year before my accident, it was part of our normal and fortunate life.

So with my returned senses came dreams, with senses and dreams came diagnosis, with diagnosis came, finally, appropriate treatment, and with the right treatment came great pain relief and some much deserved and needed increased capacity. I feel I’ve arrived on a very high mountain but had to crawl all the way up over 5 1/2 years.

So, here we are on the mountain, I mean, in Italy, and boy did we pick the right place! Not only did we have a divine holiday but we stumbled on what feels like a miracle treatment for my form of PN and that was part of the Italian lifestyle: bidets and siestas.

I set off very prepared having had nerve blocks and begun Endep before I left Melbourne. I was taking a quarter of a 10mg tablet every second day and increased the dose gradually to 3/4 per day by the end of our five-week trip (and by then I was well and truly quite happy to sleep all day even though it was Italy outside. I had to knock 1/4 off my dose).

Five weeks, yes five weeks, with PN I don’t go anywhere, do or see anything quickly. If I’m making comparisons with the old Soula, I need much more time as each 24hr day now is equivalent to 1/3… if I’m lucky! I also have my human walking stick, Theo, and another light, adjustable and foldable one. I had a few hundred gels and insoles with me and left any kind of shoe with a heel on it at home (along with any handbags which I ditched a while back anyway). I also took my ice pack and made sure I didn’t need to carry anything. Yes, you guessed it Theo carried everything, he resembles a mother with a baby bag! Our destination and time of travel choice, Italy in spring, was based on being able to wear light clothes (winter garments add weight which means pain) and accommodation was booked in city centres to avoid any daily commuting. Continue Reading

To block or not to block…

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Healing at Boboli Gardens (Porcelain Museum) FlorenceBlock!!! Absolutely, completely, totally but only if you know where…

I have to stress this post completely relates to my condition and my personal issue with Pudendal Neuralgia. I also have to state that while I document my treatments and their effects it is difficult to know whether the effects will last. That also explains why my post is written so much later than my first nerve block (Dec 2011) and will end with ‘stay tuned’.

December 7, 2011

If you’ve been following my story then you’ll know by 2011, four years post accident, I had discovered, what I’m quite sure is, the second main culprit of my injury (the first being a nasty pelvic ligament), the Pudendal Nerve. A sequence of events found me in Dr Peter Courtney’s hands who suggested we block this nerve (bilaterally) and also inject both Sacro-Illiac (SI) joints with some cortisone as they were quite bulgy, especially on the opposite side of my injury (overworked poor darling!).

Nerve blocks affect us differently but the trickiest part about the Pudendal Nerve block is that it is quite painful and ideally requires a full anaesthetic which means the blocks must be a minimum of 12 weeks apart. So if my nerve block didn’t give me relief it either meant we missed the spot (hardly unlikely in my case) or that this treatment wasn’t going to work for me. I didn’t get 12 weeks of complete relief but certainly it reduced my pain and I had many moments of total relief and some random full days too. As documented many times with this condition, treatment isn’t just about relief, it also provides more detail about the issue and this becomes a guide for the next step. It’s like taking mini steps of progress and it really feels fabulous, I feel as though I gain some control, I foresee future options and ultimately, I regain some hope. Without this I’m travelling blindly.

The main aims for a nerve block are pain relief, diagnosis and obviously a cure. Cure happens, research tells us, if the block gives long-term relief and the nerve relearns how to behave during that time (or as I prefer to believe finally gets its sedative, has a long rest and recovers).

I feel quite lucky to be tuned in to my body and able to explain how I’m feeling and what pain I have and where. During this first block I noticed the rectal branch of the nerve was not affected so sitting back, completely on my behind with my back to a chair (not supporting my upper body on a table or my hands) would trigger the pain immediately. I’d feel a heat begin, a zinging then eventually I’d have the flare up. I explained this detail to Dr Courtney and it gave us a huge lead for my second nerve block… Continue Reading

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Definitions of pain

What is Pudendal Neuralgia (PN)?
Most simply put PN is Carpal Tunnel in the pelvis/buttocks. Compression of the Pudendal Nerve occurs after trauma to the pelvis and is aggravated with pressure. The pain is often described as a toothache like pain, with spasms, sensations of tingling, numbness, or burning. It can be very debilitating.

What is Neuropathic pain?
Neuropathic pain is the result of an injury or malfunction in the peripheral or central nervous system. The pain is often triggered by an injury, but this injury may or may not involve actual damage to the nervous system. More…

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