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15th World Congress on Pain, Buenos Aires

Author:
(Excerpt from www.iasp-pain.org)

The World Congress on Pain is the premier congress devoted to the research and treatment of pain.

Every two years the Congress boasts a hearty program composed of refresher courses, plenary lectures, topical workshops and symposia, and poster presentations. The Scientific Program Committee determines the content and an esteemed faculty of experts from around the world conducts the sessions. A Local Arrangements Committee works with the Congress Secretariat and IASP to present receptions, dinners, and other social events in keeping with the host city’s culture.
Purpose and Objectives of the Congress

The World Congress on Pain is designed to:IASP logo

  • Provide a state-of-the-art overview of a wide range of topics in the area of pain
  • Offer practical reviews of current research and therapies
  • Provide continuing education credits for clinicians
  • Allow delegates to participate in formal and informal discussions with international experts on pain management and pain research

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Arthritis & Osteoporosis WA, Making Sense of Pain 14 – 15 Nov 2014

Author:
Arthritis Osteoporosis WA logo(Report prepared by Melanie Galbraith and John Quintner, Course Co-Convenors. Read more on the Arthritis & Osteoporosis WA website: www.arthritiswa.org.au )

The third inter-disciplinary workshop for health professionals

The late Robert Elvey, world-renowned Perth Manual Therapist, to whom these workshops are respectfully dedicated, would have been delighted at the enthusiasm and expertise with which our course content was delivered. Most of the attendees were physiotherapists, but there were also a few occupational therapists, podiatrists, and nurses.

Presenters & Registrants As well being truly inter-disciplinary, the other outstanding feature was the participation of our seven Pain Champions, who engaged with the attending health professionals in an honest, open and non-confronting manner.

By the end of the second day, everyone, clinicians and patients, had been given the opportunity to experience what it is like to be together in the “third space” – a clinical space for healing where “you” and “me” can become “we”.

Day 1 was about how to create the therapeutic milieu, whereas on Day 2 participants were encouraged to acquire the necessary practical skills and explore how best to apply them to real life practice.

The presenting team, led by physiotherapist Melanie Galbraith and retired rheumatologist John Quintner, included Jane Muirhead, occupational therapist, Vance Locke, psychologist, and Mary Roberts, clinical psychologist (registrar).

Together they shared a wealth of knowledge and experience with participants, and gave them valuable insights into contemporary best-practice pain management and the various language traps to be recognized and avoided in order that they do not inadvertently stigmatise their patients.

Melanie contributed “hot off the press” news from the recent World Pain Conference in Buenos Aires. The most exciting advance was the isolation of the gene FKBP5, whose genetic variants can influence not only the severity of persistent post-traumatic musculoskeletal pain experienced during the weeks following a motor vehicle collision and after early life trauma. The field of epigenetics holds great promise in helping us to better understand many painful conditions and how to manage them.

Our Pain ChampionsThe strength and weaknesses of the biomedical and biopsychosocial “models” of illness were explained and participants were then alerted to an emerging paradigm for Pain Medicine, one that transcends the body/mind dualistic thinking so stigmatizing to many people in chronic pain.

Although analgesic drugs were mentioned during the workshop, their relative inefficacy for most patients with chronic pain was emphasised. Instead, more emphasis was placed on understanding the complex clinical manifestations of stress response activation and the clinical consequences that can be observed when these responses are unable to switch themselves off when the danger or threat is no longer present.

The presenters explained the important role of non-drug contributions to pain management that can be offered by the different health professionals. The common theme running through their presentations was the importance of clinicians listening to, understanding, and continually validating the experiences of their patients. The fact that empathy has two sides (positive and negative) was also acknowledged.

Course registrants were provided with a number of key papers to read prior to attending and were also invited to complete an online questionnaire specifically designed to make them aware of their own beliefs and attitudes towards people in pain. They were asked to again complete the questionnaire two weeks after the course had concluded. The results form part of an important research project currently being undertaken by Samantha Bunzli, School of Physiotherapy, Curtin University.

Judging by the completed Course Evaluation forms it is clear that we are providing a unique learning experience for health professionals and, indirectly, for people in pain. To the best of our knowledge, our course is a unique one

Comments from participants:

“Thank you for holding such a relevant and insightful course.”

“Good experiences. Particularly the opportunity to interact/hear from those with chronic pain. The Pain Champions were very open and should be congratulated. The ideal outcome would be to have a list of practitioners/clinics of “like mind” to refer to if necessary.”

“I have enjoyed this course so much with the added benefit of having pain champions to tie all the information together, Thank you!”

“Good energy, enthusiasm, and, importantly, authenticity. It’s very clear you all have ‘purpose’ in this area. I enjoyed it and the humbleness of the group.”

We thank Jamie Martin, Vanessa Watson, Eva Miller, Barb Grinsell, Ezra Tassone, Chloe Hope Johnstone, and Matt Fletcher for so readily agreeing to take part in this workshop and for sharing so much of themselves with participants.

Expressions of interest are being invited for the next workshop to be held in early 2015. Please contact John Quintner: jqu33431@bigpond.net.au or Melanie Galbraith: MelanieG@arthritiswa.org.au


 

Making-Sense-of-Pain-workshop-flyer2Event Date

14th Nov 2014 to 15th Nov 2014

Time

08.30 – 4.30

Registration Closing Date

7th Nov 2014

Venue Information

Wyliie Arthritis Centre
17 Lemnos Street Shenton Park WA

On-site

About the venue
Lunch, morning and afternoon tea provided.

Contact

John Quintner & Melanie Galbraith
John: 0419956418 jqu33431@bigpond.net.au
Melanie: 0405963658  MelanieG@arthritiswa.org.au

Registration

General
$375.00 ea

Event Description

What sets “Making Sense of Pain” apart from other Pain Management workshops and seminars? We show you how to put this information into practice and improve your interactions with patients to ensure more positive outcomes.

This workshop is dedicated to the memory of Robert Elvey [1942-2013], a WA pioneering physiotherapist (pictured on the flyer).

Event Information

  1. Other courses provide the ‘What’ – i.e. information about evidence-based management of people with chronic pain. We also provide the ‘How’ – how to put this information into practice.
  2. We show you how to improve your interactions with patients to ensure more positive outcomes.
  3. We involve ‘pain champions’ – real people with chronic pain.
  4. Our workshop is highly inter-interactive.
  5. You will have access to an on-line questionnaire.
  6. You can join a networking group of past workshop attendees and presenters.

On completion of the course the participant will be able to:

  • (a) understand the current status of Pain Medicine theory in terms of its relative strengths and weaknesses
  • (b) understand the potential role of dysregulated stress response systems in the symptomatology of chronic widespread pain (Fibromyalgia Syndrome)
  • (c) accurately assess the impact of chronic pain on the individual across social, psychological, medical and functional parameters (including standardized outcome measures)
  • (d) promote behavioural change and institute self-management strategies (participants will be exposed to motivational interviewing, mindfulness practice, relaxation, and techniques of education to promote behavioural change) and to know when referral to other health professionals might be indicated
  • (e) have a deeper understanding of the subjective experience of the person in pain
  • (f) be more aware of his/her personal attitude(s) and communication style when interacting with chronic pain sufferers
  • (g) understand the centrality of the therapeutic alliance in effecting positive change outcomes
  • (h) better communicate with the person in pain based on an understanding of empathy in all its connotations
  • (i) provide a person in pain with an accurate, empathic, and confident explanation of their predicament

Read about the presenters on the full post at Arthritis & Osteoporosis WA’s website: www.arthritiswa.org.au
View images from Making Sense of Pain 2013.

Blog | Sexology 101 | The Internal Clitoris

Author:

Museum Of Sex Img_0927Hallelujah! Pardon my pun here, especially as I’m preaching sexuality on a Sunday morning but finally, here is some thorough research and attention for the clitoris. Thank you Louise Smith for sending this link to me.. I think it’s essential info for everyone, not just women with PN. Thank you melodiousmsm for writing this and thank you to artist and sex educator, Betty Dodson for the fabulous artwork.

(excerpt from The Internal Clitoris. Read full post here)

…Let’s also remember, female orgasm is not solely about the clitoris and vagina either. It is far more complex and also involves the workings of multiple nerves, tissues, muscles, reflexes, and mental effort. Some women can think themselves to orgasm. Others can orgasm simply by flexing their pelvic muscles. Considering all the components involved plus the variability of human beings and their anatomies, it’s extremely important to remember no two people are the same. What works for one woman may not work for another. In other words, it’s all custom under the hood….

…What really blows my mind is the plethora of misinformation that exists in textbooks, professional medical guides, and on the internet. Take for example, in one of my undergraduate textbooks titled Understanding Human Sexuality, the clitoris is depicted merely as just the glans. The sad fact is it wasn’t until the 1990’s that researchers began using MRI to study the internal structure of the clitoris. By then, the intricate details of the penis were already well-known.

(Some of you may find these drawings explicit. You may also have to turn off your ‘safety’ to watch this)

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Beyond Basics Physical Therapy

Author:

(Excerpt from the beyondbasicspt.wordpress.com blog)

amy steinAmy Stein is the founder and a practitioner of Beyond Basics Physical Therapy in NYC, specializing in pelvic floor dysfunction, pelvic pain, women’s health, and manual therapy for men, women, and children while taking a holistic approach to each patient’s entire well-being. She is the author of Heal Pelvic Pain, an easy-read, self-help book. Amy is also a contributor to the medical textbook, Female Sexual Pain Disorders: Evaluation and Management, and serves on the board of the International Pelvic Pain Society, since 2007. She is a well recognized expert in her field, lectures nationwide, and has been interviewed in media outlets ranging from the medical segments of popular TV news shows, like ABC’s 20/20 to such newspapers as the New York Daily News to internet sites like http://www.ourgyn.com. She is also an editor of painchannel.com and a member of the NVA, ICA, as well as many other organizations. Amy received her Masters in Physical Therapy from Nova Southeastern University and is currently working towards her Doctorate in Physical Therapy.

Beyond Basics Physical Therapy, located conveniently in Midtown Manhattan on 46th street between 6th and 7th Avenue, has been committed to providing integrated and individualized rehabilitation since 2003. Our highly specialized staff provides comprehensive care to patients with a variety of pelvic pain and orthopedic conditions. Continue Reading

GAIN (Gynaecological Awareness Information Network Inc)

Author:
GAIN header

Another wonderful connection I’ve made on my daily mission for understanding Pelvic Pain, is with the lovely Kathleen Mazzella, founder of GAIN (in Perth).

Gynaecology is currently not too connected to Pudendal Neuralgia (and vice versa), but after my own experience, I believe they are connceted more than we realise. After all, there are many cases of nerve issues arising after gyneocolgical procedures, but I can also report that my first issue was in fact a nasty over grown pelvic ligament that my Gynaecolgoist removed (and with it went the extremely high sensory pain possibly releasing the pressure on the Pudendal Nerve).

Obviously progress and learning about the brain, pain signals and general medical research, will change the way we tackle pelvic pain today, thankfully!

(excerpt from the GAIN website)

Our Founder

KATHLEEN (Kath) MAZZELLA
Founder of GAIN (Gynaecological Awareness Information Network Inc)

Kath has endured the trauma of being diagnosed with, and treated extensively, for a gynaecologicakathl cancer – vulval cancer.

Kath established GAIN Inc in Perth, Western Australia,  in February 2001, when she sought a support network for women who had endured the similar trauma of a gynaecological cancer, and found none.

Many women afflicted with gynaecological conditions feel alienated and isolated. They often suffer in silence, afraid of what they don’t know, and lack the courage to share their anguish.

Whilst she received adequate support from healthcare professionals, and family members, Kath still felt a dire need to be able to share her experience with other women; to know she was not alone in her suffering and healing.

“Prevention is better than cure. Most women self-examine their breasts regularly, knowing that early detection of breast cancer can be a life saver. Most women don’t realise that their vulva is, also, at risk of cancer” Kathleen explains.

Kath was 39 years old when she was told her Pap smear showed abnormal changes in the cells on her cervix, and she would need laser treatment. The appearance of a lump in the region, eighteen months later, was not flagged by her doctor as “anything to worry about”, and after another eighteen months of consultation with two other GP’s, and two gynaecologists, Kath was finally diagnosed with vulval cancer.

To save her life Kath underwent “life altering” surgery, in an area of her body all women regard as sacred. Whilst receiving adequate support from healthcare professionals, and family, Kath realised she still had a dire need to be able to share her experience with other women, including knowing that she was not alone in her suffering and healing.

In her search to find other women to talk to about her experience, Kath found none. So she placed an advert in a women’s magazine and received 38 replies, all from women who had waited a long time to share their experiences, and who were similarly grateful to have the opportunity to break their own silence.

From a position of experience, and compassion, Kath created GAIN in response to the needs of these women. Today, a vibrant cancer survivor, she continues to lobby for more awareness, funding and research for gynaecological cancers, pre-cancers and other gynaecological disorders.

Kath is also actively involved in the community working and creating awareness on gynaecological cancers.  See more of Kath around the community…

The 1st World Congress on Abdominal and Pelvic Pain

Author:

1st World Congress on Abdominal and Pelvic Pain website

Diary dates: 30 May – 1 June 2012. Beurs van Berlage. Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

(Excerpt from the Official Congress website)

Word of welcome

It is a real pleasure to invite you to a very special meeting: The 1st World Congress on Abdominal and Pelvic Pain. This meeting will be a unique opportunity to talk with colleagues who are providing care to patients with abdominal and pelvic pain. Come and feel the recognition when listening to lectures of experts who will share with you the latest information on all the different aspects of abdominal and pelvic pain.

This meeting is organized by PUGO, IPPS and ConPP, all well known associations in the world of pelvic pain. The strength of these separate organizations is now bundled in this first world meeting. Continue Reading

Pelvic Pain Support Network

Author:

 Pelvic Pain Support Network Banner

My Pudendal Neuralgia family continues to grow… I’ve just met this wonderful charity group all for raising awareness and, most importantly, existing to represent sufferers with pelvic pain. They are based in the UK but their efforts and voices span the world. So lovely to be associated with you guys! Thank you for the advocacy pelvic pain sufferers so need. Can you also talk to our Governments so that injured workers have their injuries recognised? Continue Reading

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Definitions of pain

What is Pudendal Neuralgia (PN)?
Most simply put PN is Carpal Tunnel in the pelvis/buttocks. Compression of the Pudendal Nerve occurs after trauma to the pelvis and is aggravated with pressure. The pain is often described as a toothache like pain, with spasms, sensations of tingling, numbness, or burning. It can be very debilitating.

What is Neuropathic pain?
Neuropathic pain is the result of an injury or malfunction in the peripheral or central nervous system. The pain is often triggered by an injury, but this injury may or may not involve actual damage to the nervous system. More…

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