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Lorimer Moseley

The latest pain definitions from Prof Lorimer Moseley

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Lorimer Moseley Presentations-03Lrg

Getting a grip on pain and the brain – Professor Lorimer Moseley – Successful Ageing Seminar 2013

Always great to hear the latest definitions and discoveries regarding pain from THE pain Professor, Lorimer Moseley.

It still stumps me however, to hear how ‘intelligent’ the brain is but yet how stupid its ‘brilliance’ is of learning pain tunes. In fact I’m not sure I’m stumped, I’d rather call it disbelief that all this horrific pain I’ve endured the past 6.5 years can be a tune… a learned behaviour. I certainly don’t dismiss the research and of course we’ll all be examples of different definitions of pain but in my tail’s tip, I believe my undiagnosed and unrecognised injury to my pudendal nerve injury, and the lack of treatment, has created a great wound that if not scarred will need its time to heal.

Yes, I pace up my activity (or is it better put that I juggle it well), but now that I am having appropriate treatment, I’m going to hold the thought that I may be nursing my wound towards healing. I am happy however, to let anyone who swears by ‘pain tunes’ to believe that I’m also slowly changing my brain’s pain signal and that the process is more about plasticity.

Whatever floats your boat I say, so long as it leads to cure.

Watch Lorimer’s presentation: Continue Reading

Windows into pain

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How does an NHMRC Senior Research Fellow deal with his chronic pain?

March 9, 2012 By

I have a painful shoulder. It has been hurting since mid-December. I can recall no incident – just woke up one morning with severe pain on pretty much any movement. Now, I am not looking for diagnoses, nor in fact sympathy. What I would like to do instead is to run you through some interesting reflections I have had. Continue Reading

Body in Mind

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bodyinmind.org

Research into the role of the brain in chronic pain.

Who are Body in Mind

The relationship between the body, the brain and the mind is complex and magnificent, which is why lots of people are investigating it. This website focuses on attempts to better understand the way the body, brain and mind interact. The lead scientist, Dr Lorimer Moseley, is particularly interested in the role of the brain and mind in chronic and complex pain disorders. Through collaborations with clinicians, scientists, patients and thoughtful friends, the team is exploring how the brain and its representation of the body change when pain persists, how the mind influences physiological regulation of the body, how the changes in the brain and mind can be normalised via treatment, and how we can teach people about it all in a way that is both interesting and accurate.  This website includes links to published articles, current projects, teaching resources for clinicians and lecturers, Lorimer’s books, seminars and conferences and other info that the team thinks is intriguing, important or irresistible.

The Body in Mind team includes collaborators in research experiments and clinical trials, bloggers who are kind enough to contribute to the BiM blog, and our research team here at Neuroscience Research Australia (NeuRA) and University of South Australia (UniSA). Read more…

Below is a complete list of presentations.  Clicking on the list on the right will bring up a particular presentation to view. BiM also has additional explanations and abstracts that go with some of the slides – click here for a list of blog posts which explain some of the slides. ©GL Moseley BodyInMind.com.au.

David Butler and Lorimer Moseley discuss the first five years of Explain Pain

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Do I have the Explain Pain book? Of course I do.

From YouTube:

Explain Pain has been a huge stepping stone for patients and clinicians – not only in understanding pain but being able to communicate the concepts to others. Over 5 years on, and the book is still unprecedented in its layout, descriptive illustrations and incredible bank of information. Backed entirely by scientific evidence, Explain Pain is a recommended text at many universities but also read and enjoyed by everyday people in pain.

The way relief continued…

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A few months into my implant and I felt like I was human again… my senses were back and it was incredible!! That thick pain fog was lifted and I could taste, smell, see, concentrate, focus, remember, listen, think, plan, dream, enjoy, laugh, read, oh what bliss!!!! And I also realised that the anaesthetic gives great long-lasting relief to my nervous system.

So, clearly it was time for research. Here I was for almost four years thinking my issue must have been motor/mechanical but still considering Regional Pain Syndrome, Pain loops etc along the way. I picked up a book my massage therapist, Pam Frost recommended: Norman Doidge, MD | The Brain That Changes Itself. The book referenced Dr Lorimer Moseley and mentioned something along the lines of him extending the ‘mirror box’ experiment and stated he was Australian!

So I googled… I found an ABC interview with Margaret Throsby that I had actually heard before but not remembered, and many many email addresses for a point of contact. So I wrote… I thought either I can help myself, I can help Lorimer (yes, we’re on first name basis now!) or both! Lorimer’s reply was simple: ‘…tell me roughly where you are and i can link you up with someone good’. And boy did he!!

Continue Reading: Read what happened next…

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Definitions of pain

What is Pudendal Neuralgia (PN)?
Most simply put PN is Carpal Tunnel in the pelvis/buttocks. Compression of the Pudendal Nerve occurs after trauma to the pelvis and is aggravated with pressure. The pain is often described as a toothache like pain, with spasms, sensations of tingling, numbness, or burning. It can be very debilitating.

What is Neuropathic pain?
Neuropathic pain is the result of an injury or malfunction in the peripheral or central nervous system. The pain is often triggered by an injury, but this injury may or may not involve actual damage to the nervous system. More…

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