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Pain Down There online resource

Author:
Stephanie-Yeager-screen

You might recall me plugging the Pain Down There DVD – an extensive resource for women created by Robert Echenberg, Karen Liberi, Alexandra Milspaw, and Stephanie Yeager.

Now the team have taken this a step further, turning the DVD into an online, supported program.

The idea is to offer support and pain management in small groups of 10 – 15 women who start the program at the same time. The video content is released to them online and they also get to meet as a group online with Stephanie as their personal health coach. Individually they have the option to meet with the doctor and PT – all via video conferencing.

Finally! (more…)

Dr Susie Gronski: How One Artist Used Her Hurting Strings To Stitch Back Her Life

Author:

I can’t recommend Dr Susie highly enough. I wish I had online physical therapy advice when I felt lost, unable to commute and in need of someone who could understand my pain experience.

Dr Susie really gets pelvic health issues and especially for males – oh hoorah, finally someone to help the boys!

Don’t hesitate to organise an online skype session, Dr Susie has a load of support and experience on offer.

(Post written by Dr. Susie Gronski, DPT, PRPC. Doctor of Physical Therapy. Expert pelvic health advice without the jargon)

Soula Mantalvanos has been dealing with pelvic pain for over nine years. She’s an aspiring creative living in Australia. An artist who battles Pudendal Neuralgia through her words & artwork. Soula’s a die hard advocate for persistent pelvic pain sufferers.

She’s also the author of our newest blog post – How One Artist Used Her Hurting Strings To Stitch Back Her Life.

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My interview with Pelvic Zen coming up this week

Author:

Sullivan Physical Therapy StaffI was contacted by Sullivan Physical Therapy a little while back, asking if they could have Sullivan Physical Therapy’s clinic listed on pudendalnerve.com.au. The clinic specialises in women’s and men’s health conditions related to the pelvic floor and is located in Austin Texas. But after visiting their websites and seeing all their amazing work, I offered that we take the post further and see if we could collaborate to create more awareness for pelvic pain, after all that is the purpose of my advocacy, and Sullivan Physical Therapy’s aim is to reach and help people with pelvic pain. And collaborate we can! These guys are so onto everything pelvic pain. Their therapists are actively organising their own radio shows, blogs, and this is the sort of social media that links perfectly with other supportive pelvic pain networks which then allows us all, to reach more people.

Caitlin McCurdy-Robinson Pelvic Zen, is a show designed to promote pelvic floor wellness in men and women. Caitlin McCurdy-Robinson, who hosts the show is a Physical Therapist at Sullivan Physical Therapy. This is our first collaboration event and you’re all invited to the interview. I will be speaking with Caitlin this week;

live on Thursday 10th at 5:30pm Austin, Texas (Central Standard Time) / Friday 11th 8:30am Melbourne Australia (Eastern Standard time). (more…)

Arthritis & Osteoporosis WA, Making Sense of Pain, 7-8th March

Author:

Update March 13, 2014

The Inter-disciplinary Workshop for Health Professionals, Making Sense of Pain, was organised by Dr John Quintner (Pain Medicine physician) and Melanie Galbraith (Physiotherapist).

The Workshop was sponsored by Arthritis and Osteoporosis WA and held at the Wyllie Arthritis Centre, 7th and 8th March 2014.

Key presenters were John, Melanie, Mary Roberts (Psychologist), Jane Muirhead (Occupational Therapist) and Vance Locke (Academic Psychologist) were key presenters.

Vanessa Watson and Eva Miller were our two Pain Champions who told their stories and engaged with the Health Professionals on the second day of the workshop.

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Event Description

The aim of this workshop is to provide physiotherapists and other health professionals with an opportunity to effectively translate their knowledge and skills into clinical practice. Of equal importance is that they become aware of their own beliefs and attitudes to people in pain and the potential for these attributes to colour therapeutic relationships and influence outcomes. (more…)

The Spine & Joint Centre, Netherlands

Author:

The Spine & Joint Centre, NetherlandsThe kindness of the pain world just keeps on delivering… The time and effort specialists take to email and share their resources and offer advice for pelvic pain / Pundendal Neuralgia (PN) is astounding and something that moves me so much. Having the website setup to be able to pass the info on is the ultimate. The chronic pain world is hellish, but like many of life’s screaming contrasts, for all the hellish qualities of pain comes a community that offers warmth, understanding, support, sacrifice, and the utmost kindness.

I can go on but my point is, I’ve found another brilliant pain centre and I want to share it. Quickly. Are you in the Netherlands? I believe you’re a phone call away from changing your pain situation (and participating in a ping pong game after your appointment!). (more…)

PN Directory: Who can help and where in the world are they?

Author:

Pudendal Neuralgia treaters around the world

I’m sure there are more practitioners and therapists helping with Chronic Pelvic Pain but these are the ones I have been in touch with or have been referred to from other specialists. Please let me know if you have been treated appropriately so I can keep my resource up-to-date. I do particularly want to hear personal recommendations but I also need approval to list anyone here.

Australia

Melbourne

Adele Burgess
Head of Dept. Colorectal Surgery
The Austin Hospital, Heidelberg, VIC.
Private Consulting Main Rooms:
Suite 7, Level 2, 8 Martin Street, Heidelberg VIC 3084.
Phone: 03 9456 9077 Fax: 03 9456 9177
Also at : Epworth Hospital, Richmond VIC
www.adeleburgess.com.au

Peter Courtney
499 Springvale Road, Glen Waverley, VIC, 3150
Phone: (03) 9566 2733
Melbourne Pain Group

Dr Bruce Mitchell
Metropain Group

Sports & Interventional Pain Physician
Level 1, 544 Hawthorn Road, Caulfield South Victoria, 3162
Phone: (03) 9595 6111
bmitchell@metropain.com.au
www.metropain.com.au

Julienne Moore
Associate Physiotherapist
Albert Street Medical Centre
Level 4, 372 – 376 Albert Street, East Melbourne, Victoria, 3002.
Phone: (03) 9486 0512
julienne@fitwise.com.au
www.fitwise.com.au

Pain Matrix
Dr Michael Vagg – Pain Specialist, Dr Diarmuid McCoy – Pain Specialist, Dr Brett Chandler – Pain Specialist, Jenny Bravin – Psychologist, Emma Musella – Clinical Psychologist, Dr Stephen McKenzie – Psychologist, Lucy Schipanski – Physiotherapist, Ben Boyd – Practice Manager
Suite 8 | Level 2 | 73 Little Ryrie St
Geelong Victoria 3220
Phone: 03 5229 6996 Fax: 03 5229 0941
info@painmatrix.com.au
www.painmatrix.com.au

Anne-Florence Plante
Pelvic Chronic Pain,
The Women’s Physiotherapy Department
The Women’s chronic pelvic pain pdf

Professor Teddy
(Responsible for my peripheral stimulation device)
Precision Neurosurgery

Phone: 1300 773 247
info@precisionneurosurgery.com.au
Neurosurgeon, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Western Hospital, and Northern Hospital

Victorian Pain Specialists
(my current treatment team)

27 Erin Street
Richmond VIC 3121

1300 798 682 (tel)
1300 798 385 (fax)
reception@vicpain.com.au
vicpain.com.au

Queensland

Sue Croft Physiotherapist
Physiotherapy for Pelvic Floor Recovery
47 Hampstead Road, Highgate Hill, Qld, 4101
Phone  07 3848 9601 Fax 07 3846 6811
Mob: 0407 659357
www.suecroftphysiotherapist.com.au
twitter.com/scroftpf

Peter Dornan Physiotherapy (Specialising in Men’s Health)
13 Morley Street,
4066 Toowong QLD, Australia
Phone: 07 3371 9155
peter@peterdornanphysio.com.au

Robin Kerr
Integrated Pelvic Physiotherapy
7 Maud Street Nambour QLD, 4560
Phone:(07) 5441 4764
robin@ipphysio.com
www.ipphysio.com

South Australia

Dr Susan Evans
38 The Parade, Norwood SA, 5067
Phone: 08 8363 2811  – for appointments (except physiotherapy)
Phone: 08 8363 7071 – for physiotherapy appointments
drsusanevans.com.au

Sydney

Sherin Jarvis
Pelvic Floor Physiotherapist and a Conjoint Lecturer, UNSW
Level 12, 97-99 Bathurst St, Sydney,
Phone: 1300 722 206
info@whria.com.au
Women’s Health and Research Institute of Australia

Thierry Vancaillie MD (Belgium), FRANZCOG, FFPMANZCA
Gynaecologist and Pain Medicine Specialist
Conjoint Professor, UNSW
Level 12, 97-99 Bathurst St, Sydney,
Phone: 1300 722 206
Women’s Health and Research Institute of Australia

Western Australia

Alison Lutz
APA Continence and Women’s Health Physiotherapist
Hillview Physiotherapy
6/294 Gt Eastern Hwy
Midland  WA 6056
Ph:08 9274 5666 Fax: 08 6230 5376

Timothy J G  Pavy
Head, Department of Anaesthesia and Pain Medicine
King Edward Memorial Hospital for Women
374 Bagot Road, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008
Clinical Associate Professor, School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia
Phone: 08 9340 2222 Fax: 08 9340 2227
Tim.Pavy@health.wa.gov.au

Judith Thompson
Dip Physio, Post Grad Dip Continence and Women’s Health,
PhD, FACP, APAM
Clinical Director & Specialist Continence and Women’s Health Physiotherapist
Shenton Park Clinic
215 Nicholson Road Shenton Park WA 6008
Phone: 08 9381 7940 Fax: 08 9381 7941
www.bodylogicphysiotherapy.com

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The Physiotherapy Pain Association (PPA)

Author:

PPA, thanks for the link on Your Happy Friday Links webpage, what a great idea!

http://ppa.csp.org.uk/documents/happy-friday-links-26th-october-2012

About the PPA

For Chartered Physiotherapists and other practitioners involved in the treatment of patients with acute or chronic pain.

The Physiotherapy Pain Association (PPA) was formed to bring together and provide information for Physiotherapists with the common interest of managing patients with both acute and long term pain. The PPA was established in 1994 for Chartered Physiotherapists and was recognised as a Clinical Interest Group of the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy (CSP) in 1996.

The PPA will hold an interest for those physiotherapists working in an out patient department using traditional physiotherapy interventions and interested in developing evidence based best practice, through to those working in a multidisciplinary pain clinic to those using the integrated approach in pain management programmes.

You will find like minded colleagues within the Association who are enthusiastic to discuss and progress ideas and challenges in developing physiotherapy practice within local, national and international scientific communities.

One of the key objectives of the Association is to promote the role of physiotherapy in the relief and management of pain to other Professionals as well as to Physiotherapists.

 Read more about PPA on their website.

Chronic Pelvic Pain Clinic at the Women’s

Author:

The following information comes from the Women’s Chronic Pelvic Pain Clinic webpage. This page also provides a fact sheet available for download as a printable PDF.

The clinic offers an alternative approach for women who have tried other treatment options but still have a high level of pain. The staff in the clinic come from a range of health professions. Together we will work with you to explore the range of possible causes for your pain and to offer ways to treat or to help you manage your pain.

There is good evidence to suggest that this approach to chronic pain is beneficial.

Our aim is to work with you to increase your quality of life.

What is chronic pelvic pain?

Chronic pelvic pain is pain that you have had in your pelvis for more than six months. The pain may be there all the time or it might come and go. There are many possible causes for chronic pelvic pain, but sometimes the cause may never be found.

When a cause cannot be found for your pain, treatment is aimed at helping you to manage it so as to improve your quality of life.

What do we do?

Pain can be influenced by physical, social and psychological factors. Our team is trained to look at the things in your life that may be adding to your experience of pain.

Because every woman’s history or experience of pain is different, we begin by doing a very thorough assessment of your pain. After a full assessment by all the health practitioners, we will meet to decide a treatment plan for you.

Some women may also benefit from a group program which runs for two hours, each week, for 12 weeks. The program aims to reduce pain and more importantly improve function.

Read more…

Diagnosis: Physiotherapy at the Women’s

Author:

It felt like a miracle and took all of about 15 minutes for the physiotherapist (at the chronic pelvic pain clinic at the Women’s here in Melbourne Australia) to give me her French infused explanation that my pain was most probably coming from my Pudendal Nerve (yes, a name, I had a name!). It took another 15mins for her to put me in on my back (I never lay on my back as it was too painful) and apply a pressure/postural technique that switched my pain off! (Yes, OFF… calm, silence, stillness, roar gone, no spasm, quiet, peace)… unbelievable but this is true.

I won’t go into much detail about how I felt, there really isn’t any way of explaining the relief of having a roaring pain that’s been halting your soul for 4.5 years, identified, clarified, acknowledged, manipulated with a single finger’s pressure point. I can’t explain how it felt to finally know (not hope or dream) that I will eventually become the best I can and that I finally found a practitioner and therapy that was going to help me. I could almost see my issue in the palm of my hand (before I was in limbo and had to come up with my own names, I won’t write them here!!).

What I will describe though, is the language, empathy, understanding and thorough explanations that I have had during my appointments so that anyone else in the same situation will know exactly where they need to go (Actually I’d be surprised if you were still reading! Taxi!! Physiotherapy Department, 1st floor Grattan Street & Flemington Road Parkville VIC).

My conversations have gone something like this:
Me: I haven’t told anyone this but there’s this short denim skirt I have and whenever I wear it I have a less painful day…
Physiotherapist leaves and comes back with a pregnancy/baby pressure belt that is adjustable either side. Et voila, a support for the pelvis adjustable to my requirements which was not so tight over my implant and uninjured side.

Me: In winter, I’m sure it hurts more to walk because my boots are heavier than shoes and I’m wearing a heavy coat.
Physiotherapist: Yes, weight is pressure for the nerve.

Me: I’m on fire today, I have all this burning, like fireworks going on.
Physiotherapist: lies me prone, applies pressure to a pressure point, fire put out instantly. This is a flare up.

Me: I feel like I have my finger stuck in a power point, I have a surge up my spine, the rattle of a tram or car drives me crazy, and don’t scare me or I’ll drop, my legs get weak and I can’t move….
Physiotherapist: Sensory pain.

Physiotherapist: How is your pain now?
Me: My pain is good now.
Physiotherapist: Laughs… but doesn’t really find this funny. Pain is never good.

So now when I have a physiotherapy appointment, instead of blank stares when I attempt to describe the fine details of my pain and activities I get clear descriptions for every point I make, in fact I even get a diagram and descriptive explanation, drawings referencing my insides, url links, and best of all, solutions in the form of techniques to release my pain, positions to release my entrapped nerve, even my husband gets attention, empathy for the difficulty he endures, he is shown the pressure points and techniques so he can help as accurately as possible (therefore finally finding peace for himself!!). I even had an explanation about my extracted ligament and septum, she’d seen it happen with trauma (pregnancy or birth) to the hips.

Finding this wonderful therapist leaves me in a very positive position too. I never had options before, I was told: go home and make yourself comfortable, but now I can calm my pain and I still have further treatments to explore depending on how I progress and this is thanks to the few specialists that have insisted on researching and learning about peripheral neuralgia and not ignored it leaving it a psychological condition or the more general we don’t know with back pain.

Read more about The Women‘s Physiotherapy Department.

Related Posts
My pre pain life…
My family, Theo, Origin of Image & Zephyr…
The big bang injury…
The way relief started…
The way relief continued…
Building Blocks…
Next stop: Traditional Chinese Medicine…
Soula’s PN Weather Update…
My practitioners

My list of practitioners

Author:

The most supported I’ve felt is when I’ve come across a practitioner who listens and wants to work with me specifically. I mean really take note of what’s going on and want to learn themselves too. Chronic pain is still so difficult to understand, and of course I can’t recommend or even suggest that my experience might be a solution for someone else but I can provide the contact details for ‘team Soula’.

Stage 1: The Search
Dr Harry Crock, retired
Mr Roy Carey, East Melbourne
Professor Michael Quinn The Women’s, The Royal Women’s Hosptial, Parkville
Pond Massage Water Wellness P/L, Collingwood
Pam Frost, Massage therapist, Inspiral Bodywork, Fitzroy

Stage 2: Implant
Dr Kathy Yu, Melbourne Sports Medicine Centre, Melbourne
Pam Frost, Massage therapist, Yoga Healing Centre, Fitzroy
Professor Teddy, Neurosurgeon, Precision Neurosurgery, Melbourne
Marilyn Lock, Knowbody Studios (Holistic physiotherapy), East Melbourne
Pam Frost, Massage therapist, Inspiral Bodywork, Fitzroy

Stage 3: Diagnosis
(All stage 2 practitioners)
Robert Postlethwaite, Psychiatrist, Freemasons Medical Centre, East Melbourne
The Women’s – Anne Florence Plante, Physiotherapist, RWH Physiotherapy department, chronic pelvic pain clinic
Dr Peter Courtney, Melbourne Pain Group, Glen Waverley
Pam Frost, Massage therapist, Inspiral Bodywork, Fitzroy

Stage 4: Treatment
Dr Peter Courtney, Melbourne Pain Group, Glen Waverley
The Women’s – Anne Florence Plante, Physiotherapist, RWH Physiotherapy department, chronic pelvic pain clinic
Raffaele Vavala, Traditional Chinese Medicine, 4a Mitchell Street Northcote
Pam Frost, Massage therapist, Inspiral Bodywork, Fitzroy

Related Posts
My pre pain life…
My family, Theo, Origin of Image & Zephyr…
The big bang injury…
The way relief started…
The way relief continued…
Diagnosis: Physiotherapy at The Women’s…
Building Blocks…
Next stop: Traditional Chinese Medicine…
Soula’s PN Weather Update…
My practitioners

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What is Pudendal Neuralgia (PN)?

Most simply put PN is Carpal Tunnel in the pelvis/buttocks. Compression of the Pudendal Nerve occurs after trauma to the pelvis and is aggrevated with pressure. The pain is often described as a toothache like pain, with spasms, sensations of tingling, numbness, or burning. It can be very debilitating.

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