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Patient to Practitioner Access: Too Much?

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It all started with emails. I bet most medical professionals felt alarmed as email communication began with patients.

Wasn’t the existing scenario suitable enough? Call the receptionist – make several attempts to get through, rattle off suitable dates, wait for that day to come around, get to the waiting room, sit, sit and then finally release that conversation that’s been swirling in your head… if that’s even possible in the allocated 15 minutes.

I’m sure some medical professionals still appreciate and stick by this scenario. I know quite a few that do.

Isn’t life short enough?

Thankfully, my pain specialist (Dr Nick Christelis), and his team have progressed further, throwing their whole practice (Vicpain) on as many social media platforms as they can. Continue Reading

Pain Down There online resource

Author:
Stephanie-Yeager-screen

You might recall me plugging the Pain Down There DVD – an extensive resource for women created by Robert Echenberg, Karen Liberi, Alexandra Milspaw, and Stephanie Yeager.

Now the team have taken this a step further, turning the DVD into an online, supported program.

The idea is to offer support and pain management in small groups of 10 – 15 women who start the program at the same time. The video content is released to them online and they also get to meet as a group online with Stephanie as their personal health coach. Individually they have the option to meet with the doctor and PT – all via video conferencing.

Finally! Continue Reading

Arthritis & Osteoporosis WA, Making Sense of Pain June 26 – 27, 2015

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Calling all Health Professionals
“MAKING SENSE OF PAIN”
Our fourth inter-disciplinary workshop

Register now.
Early bird registrations close on 12th June!

Presenters & RegistrantsWe offer health professionals a unique opportunity to update their knowledge and skills and to effectively transfer them into their clinical practice setting.

Our experienced team, which comprises “pain champions” together with experienced clinicians and researchers, present a unique learning experience conducted in a user-friendly environment.

Date: Friday 26th – Saturday 27th June, 2015.

Presenters: Ms Melanie Galbraith (Physiotherapist), Assoc-Professor Vance Locke (Academic Psychologist), Ms Jane Muirhead (Occupational Therapist), Dr John Quintner (Physician in Rheumatology and Pain Medicine), Ms Mary Roberts (Clinical Psychologist).

Pain champions: to be announced

Venue: Wyllie Arthritis Centre, 17 Lemnos St. SHENTON PARK WA

[N.B. This workshop is fully catered and FREE on-site parking is available.]

For details and to Register or contact:
Melanie Galbraith, MelanieG@arthritiswa.org.au or
John Quintner, jqu33431@bigpond.net.au

View information about previous workshops

Dr Doidge, Are Some Brains More Plastic than Others?

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I never shop from my phone, but given Theo and I were away for the weekend (researching our next phase of life), I felt it was worth the risk responding to The School of Life‘s Dr Norman Doidge event and booked our two tickets.

Glad I did. The event was sold out within the week and over 300 people were on the cancellation list.

In 2011, after my peripheral stimulation device was implanted (and having my reading ability restored), I reached for  Dr Doidge‘s, The Brain That Changes Itself, and grasped the idea to contact Prof Lorimer Moseley who was referenced within the book.

That idea led to my diagnosis.

So my mind ran. What might happen if I actually met Dr Doidge?! Continue Reading

An Integrated Approach to Pelvic Pain

Author:

Interview with Robert J. Echenberg, medical advisory board ICA.

ICAUpdate-(2015-Spring)Echenberg-1Dr. Robert J. Echenberg is the founder of the Echenberg Institute for Pelvic and Sexual Pain in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. Previously known as the Institute for Women in Pain, Dr. Echenberg’s practice is one of the first privately owned multi-disciplinary practices exclusively specializing in assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of chronic pelvic pain (CPP). Since its inception in 2006, the Institute has treated more than 1,200 women and a growing number of men with pelvic and sexual pain disorders from 25 states and five countries.

A member of ICA’s Medical Advisory Board, Dr. Echenberg is the author of the book Secret Suffering: How Women’s Pelvic and Sexual Pain Affects Their Relationships. Dr. Echenberg spoke with ICA Update about IC and overlapping conditions, why education must come before medication, and ways in which the medical system must change to address the needs of patients with overlapping chronic inflammatory and pain conditions.

An Integrated Approach to Pelvic Pain was published in the current edition of the ICA Update.

The Interstitial Cystitis Association (ICA) is the only nonprofit association dedicated solely to improving the quality of healthcare and lives of people living with interstitial cystitis (IC).

Interview—Mark Toner
Mark Toner is editor of ICA Update

Talk about how IC fits into the variety of overlapping conditions you treat.

I started this program in 2001 when asked to develop a nonsurgical approach to female pelvic pain through our  department of obstetrics and gynecology. We knew that all over the country young women were receiving multiple invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures for persistent and otherwise unexplained painful symptoms in the pelvic region (between the belly button and mid thigh). I found early on that IC was a cornerstone, if not one of the most common triggers of pelvic pain.

There’s a huge spectrum of pelvic pain patients, both male and female. Many conditions within the pelvic organs such as IC, endometriosis, and IBS are common organ or visceral generators of pain within the pelvis, but what I soon realized is that we were generally not even thinking of all the muscles, ligaments, and nerves that almost always contribute to the pain itself.

Much of the literature and my own experience since 2001 points to bladder pain syndromes being at least part of the picture of chronic pelvic, genital, and sexual pain about 80 to 85 percent of the time. That’s a huge number, and chronic pelvic pain translates into tens of millions of individuals in the U.S. alone. Not only are multiple parts of the anatomic pelvis involved in persistent painful pelvic symptoms, but there are also many overlapping inflammatory issues and other pain syndromes commonly associated with CPP. These include migraine, fibromyalgia, TMJ, multiple chemical sensitivity syndrome, all the autoimmune disorders, and others. IC patients are among large numbers of people suffering not only pain, but also fatigue, sleep disorders, hypersensitivities, allergies, and other slowly disabling illnesses that plague our health care system. Continue Reading

This Train is Bound for… Wholeville: A Travel Guide for the Perplexed

Author:

Who would have thought that pain and the design process would have found a way to merge in my life. Design is however all about communication, and being a creative communicator I got wondering about how one can document their pain journey.

I also believe from my experience with chronic pain that the area is poorly provided when it comes to expression and language. How is it possible for a patient to describe their situation when their situation has no current definition or current way to be described?

So I thought of a concept! I called it Pain Train and two wonderful things were conceived from it. My soon to be publicised online resource, and a brilliant research paper by John Quintner and Melanie Galbraith.

Pain professionals, John and Melanie, are Pain Train’s first conductors and they have applied their exceptional chronic pain knowledge to the concept with their research paper, This Train is Bound for… Wholeville: A Travel Guide for the Perplexed (download or read below).

John Quintner and Melanie Galbraith are aiming to give people in pain sufficient knowledge so that they can meaningfully engage with their respective health care professionals.This-Train-is-Bound-For-Wholeville

Continue Reading

The School of Life special event: Norman Doidge On Neuroplasticity

Author:

I have a soft spot for Norman Doidge!

I associate his book, The Brain That Changes Itself, with my second biggest turning point (I’ve had a few if you want to read about them: turning point 1, 2, 3…)

You can hear Norman Doidge speak about his latest book, The Brain’s Way of Healing thanks to the fabulous School of Life. Here are all the details:

We know that our minds and bodies are intricately connected, but can changing our minds improve our health?

Continue Reading

PNA Pudendal Neuralgia Patient Conference 2015

Author:

Register at: pudendalassociation.org

For Patients with Chronic Pelvic Pain
SEPTEMBER 25, 2015
Sheraton Annapolis, ANNAPOLIS, MARYLAND

TopicsPudendal Neuralgia Conference 2015 flyer

  • Overview of Pudendal Neuralgia: Concomitant Conditions: IC, Vulvodynia, Vestibulitis, Endometriosis, Irritable Bowel Syndrome, and Non-surgical Treatments
  • Anatomy of the Pudendal Nerve / Magnetic Resonance Neurography
  • Physiology of Pain / Image Guided Nerve Blocks/ Radiofrequency Ablation, and Cryoablation
  • Integrative Medical Therapies for Pudendal Neuralgia
  • Physical Therapy: A Non-Invasive Treatment Option for Pudendal Neuralgia
  • Surgical Treatments: Transgluteal Pudendal Neurolysis
  • Neuromodulation for Pain, Bowel and Bladder Incontinence
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Mind/Body Techniques and Biofeedback
  • Psychotherapy: Body, Mind and Spirit

Continue Reading

Arthritis & Osteoporosis WA, Making Sense of Pain 14 – 15 Nov 2014

Author:
Arthritis Osteoporosis WA logo(Report prepared by Melanie Galbraith and John Quintner, Course Co-Convenors. Read more on the Arthritis & Osteoporosis WA website: www.arthritiswa.org.au )

The third inter-disciplinary workshop for health professionals

The late Robert Elvey, world-renowned Perth Manual Therapist, to whom these workshops are respectfully dedicated, would have been delighted at the enthusiasm and expertise with which our course content was delivered. Most of the attendees were physiotherapists, but there were also a few occupational therapists, podiatrists, and nurses.

Presenters & Registrants As well being truly inter-disciplinary, the other outstanding feature was the participation of our seven Pain Champions, who engaged with the attending health professionals in an honest, open and non-confronting manner.

By the end of the second day, everyone, clinicians and patients, had been given the opportunity to experience what it is like to be together in the “third space” – a clinical space for healing where “you” and “me” can become “we”.

Day 1 was about how to create the therapeutic milieu, whereas on Day 2 participants were encouraged to acquire the necessary practical skills and explore how best to apply them to real life practice.

The presenting team, led by physiotherapist Melanie Galbraith and retired rheumatologist John Quintner, included Jane Muirhead, occupational therapist, Vance Locke, psychologist, and Mary Roberts, clinical psychologist (registrar).

Together they shared a wealth of knowledge and experience with participants, and gave them valuable insights into contemporary best-practice pain management and the various language traps to be recognized and avoided in order that they do not inadvertently stigmatise their patients.

Melanie contributed “hot off the press” news from the recent World Pain Conference in Buenos Aires. The most exciting advance was the isolation of the gene FKBP5, whose genetic variants can influence not only the severity of persistent post-traumatic musculoskeletal pain experienced during the weeks following a motor vehicle collision and after early life trauma. The field of epigenetics holds great promise in helping us to better understand many painful conditions and how to manage them.

Our Pain ChampionsThe strength and weaknesses of the biomedical and biopsychosocial “models” of illness were explained and participants were then alerted to an emerging paradigm for Pain Medicine, one that transcends the body/mind dualistic thinking so stigmatizing to many people in chronic pain.

Although analgesic drugs were mentioned during the workshop, their relative inefficacy for most patients with chronic pain was emphasised. Instead, more emphasis was placed on understanding the complex clinical manifestations of stress response activation and the clinical consequences that can be observed when these responses are unable to switch themselves off when the danger or threat is no longer present.

The presenters explained the important role of non-drug contributions to pain management that can be offered by the different health professionals. The common theme running through their presentations was the importance of clinicians listening to, understanding, and continually validating the experiences of their patients. The fact that empathy has two sides (positive and negative) was also acknowledged.

Course registrants were provided with a number of key papers to read prior to attending and were also invited to complete an online questionnaire specifically designed to make them aware of their own beliefs and attitudes towards people in pain. They were asked to again complete the questionnaire two weeks after the course had concluded. The results form part of an important research project currently being undertaken by Samantha Bunzli, School of Physiotherapy, Curtin University.

Judging by the completed Course Evaluation forms it is clear that we are providing a unique learning experience for health professionals and, indirectly, for people in pain. To the best of our knowledge, our course is a unique one

Comments from participants:

“Thank you for holding such a relevant and insightful course.”

“Good experiences. Particularly the opportunity to interact/hear from those with chronic pain. The Pain Champions were very open and should be congratulated. The ideal outcome would be to have a list of practitioners/clinics of “like mind” to refer to if necessary.”

“I have enjoyed this course so much with the added benefit of having pain champions to tie all the information together, Thank you!”

“Good energy, enthusiasm, and, importantly, authenticity. It’s very clear you all have ‘purpose’ in this area. I enjoyed it and the humbleness of the group.”

We thank Jamie Martin, Vanessa Watson, Eva Miller, Barb Grinsell, Ezra Tassone, Chloe Hope Johnstone, and Matt Fletcher for so readily agreeing to take part in this workshop and for sharing so much of themselves with participants.

Expressions of interest are being invited for the next workshop to be held in early 2015. Please contact John Quintner: jqu33431@bigpond.net.au or Melanie Galbraith: MelanieG@arthritiswa.org.au


 

Making-Sense-of-Pain-workshop-flyer2Event Date

14th Nov 2014 to 15th Nov 2014

Time

08.30 – 4.30

Registration Closing Date

7th Nov 2014

Venue Information

Wyliie Arthritis Centre
17 Lemnos Street Shenton Park WA

On-site

About the venue
Lunch, morning and afternoon tea provided.

Contact

John Quintner & Melanie Galbraith
John: 0419956418 jqu33431@bigpond.net.au
Melanie: 0405963658  MelanieG@arthritiswa.org.au

Registration

General
$375.00 ea

Event Description

What sets “Making Sense of Pain” apart from other Pain Management workshops and seminars? We show you how to put this information into practice and improve your interactions with patients to ensure more positive outcomes.

This workshop is dedicated to the memory of Robert Elvey [1942-2013], a WA pioneering physiotherapist (pictured on the flyer).

Event Information

  1. Other courses provide the ‘What’ – i.e. information about evidence-based management of people with chronic pain. We also provide the ‘How’ – how to put this information into practice.
  2. We show you how to improve your interactions with patients to ensure more positive outcomes.
  3. We involve ‘pain champions’ – real people with chronic pain.
  4. Our workshop is highly inter-interactive.
  5. You will have access to an on-line questionnaire.
  6. You can join a networking group of past workshop attendees and presenters.

On completion of the course the participant will be able to:

  • (a) understand the current status of Pain Medicine theory in terms of its relative strengths and weaknesses
  • (b) understand the potential role of dysregulated stress response systems in the symptomatology of chronic widespread pain (Fibromyalgia Syndrome)
  • (c) accurately assess the impact of chronic pain on the individual across social, psychological, medical and functional parameters (including standardized outcome measures)
  • (d) promote behavioural change and institute self-management strategies (participants will be exposed to motivational interviewing, mindfulness practice, relaxation, and techniques of education to promote behavioural change) and to know when referral to other health professionals might be indicated
  • (e) have a deeper understanding of the subjective experience of the person in pain
  • (f) be more aware of his/her personal attitude(s) and communication style when interacting with chronic pain sufferers
  • (g) understand the centrality of the therapeutic alliance in effecting positive change outcomes
  • (h) better communicate with the person in pain based on an understanding of empathy in all its connotations
  • (i) provide a person in pain with an accurate, empathic, and confident explanation of their predicament

Read about the presenters on the full post at Arthritis & Osteoporosis WA’s website: www.arthritiswa.org.au
View images from Making Sense of Pain 2013.

Arthritis & Osteoporosis WA, Making Sense of Pain, 7-8th March

Author:

Update March 13, 2014

The Inter-disciplinary Workshop for Health Professionals, Making Sense of Pain, was organised by Dr John Quintner (Pain Medicine physician) and Melanie Galbraith (Physiotherapist).

The Workshop was sponsored by Arthritis and Osteoporosis WA and held at the Wyllie Arthritis Centre, 7th and 8th March 2014.

Key presenters were John, Melanie, Mary Roberts (Psychologist), Jane Muirhead (Occupational Therapist) and Vance Locke (Academic Psychologist) were key presenters.

Vanessa Watson and Eva Miller were our two Pain Champions who told their stories and engaged with the Health Professionals on the second day of the workshop.

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Event Description

The aim of this workshop is to provide physiotherapists and other health professionals with an opportunity to effectively translate their knowledge and skills into clinical practice. Of equal importance is that they become aware of their own beliefs and attitudes to people in pain and the potential for these attributes to colour therapeutic relationships and influence outcomes. Continue Reading

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What is Pudendal Neuralgia (PN)?

Most simply put PN is Carpal Tunnel in the pelvis/buttocks. Compression of the Pudendal Nerve occurs after trauma to the pelvis and is aggrevated with pressure. The pain is often described as a toothache like pain, with spasms, sensations of tingling, numbness, or burning. It can be very debilitating.

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