Looking for Something?
Browsing Category

Learn

Your Pace Yoga: new videos

Author:

Dustienne Miller

This is exciting. I’m republishing my post from way back when I just began to manage some yoga again.

I have maintained Dustienne’s program – albeit a small 20 minute portion – it’s still mammoth for me.

Dustienne has now produced more pelvic specific yoga videos and although I might not dare try anything new just yet, I had to share these with you all as they sound great:

Listen to your bod… go slow!


(Read the original post) Continue Reading

Making Sense of Pain: A workshop for Health Professionals

Author:
Making Sense of Pain

What sets “Making Sense of Pain” apart from other Pain Management workshops and seminars? We show you how to put this information into practice and improve your interactions with patients to ensure more positive outcomes.

This workshop is dedicated to the memory of Robert Elvey [1942-2013], a WA pioneering physiotherapist.

Venue Information

Wyliie Arthritis Centre
17 Lemnos Street Shenton Park WA

On-site

About the venue
Lunch, morning and afternoon tea provided.

Contact

John Quintner & Melanie Galbraith
John: 0419956418 jqu33431@bigpond.net.au
Melanie: 0405963658 MelanieG@arthritiswa.org.au Continue Reading

Yes, it is like taming a beast

Author:

You’ve all heard the impact Prof Lorimer Moseley made on my pain journey – well my diagnosis actually.

If it weren’t for him I wonder how much longer I would have been left searching for the reason behind (pardon the pun) the pain. It took 4.5 years!

Lorimer’s research continues and this time he’s teamed up with some fabulous physiotherapists to make a lighthearted – but still serious, animation about chronic pain.

Continue Reading

Patient to Practitioner Access: Too Much?

Author:

It all started with emails. I bet most medical professionals felt alarmed as email communication began with patients.

Wasn’t the existing scenario suitable enough? Call the receptionist – make several attempts to get through, rattle off suitable dates, wait for that day to come around, get to the waiting room, sit, sit and then finally release that conversation that’s been swirling in your head… if that’s even possible in the allocated 15 minutes.

I’m sure some medical professionals still appreciate and stick by this scenario. I know quite a few that do.

Isn’t life short enough?

Thankfully, my pain specialist (Dr Nick Christelis), and his team have progressed further, throwing their whole practice (Vicpain) on as many social media platforms as they can. Continue Reading

Not the fitball’s fault – it’s Nav1.7’s

Author:

How a Single Gene Could Become a Volume Knob for Pain

(Excerpt from How a Single Gene Could Become a Volume Knob for Human Suffering by Erika Hayasaki | art by Sean Freeman 04.18.17 on Wired)

…When Stephen Waxman was a student at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the early 1970s, he became interested in painhow people feel it, how the body transmits it, and how, as a future neurologist, he could learn to control it. Later in his career, after his father was in the final stages of agonizing diabetic neuropathy, he became obsessed with helping patients like his dad, who could find no relief from their pain. “We simply had to do better,” he says. Continue Reading

Pain Down There online resource

Author:
Stephanie-Yeager-screen

You might recall me plugging the Pain Down There DVD – an extensive resource for women created by Robert Echenberg, Karen Liberi, Alexandra Milspaw, and Stephanie Yeager.

Now the team have taken this a step further, turning the DVD into an online, supported program.

The idea is to offer support and pain management in small groups of 10 – 15 women who start the program at the same time. The video content is released to them online and they also get to meet as a group online with Stephanie as their personal health coach. Individually they have the option to meet with the doctor and PT – all via video conferencing.

Finally! Continue Reading

Can virtual reality really soothe pain?

Author:

How VR could break America’s opioid addiction

Can virtual reality really soothe pain? Jo Marchant meets the doctors who say yes, and who hope this is a solution for the country consuming 80 per cent of the world’s opioid supply: the United States of America.

“It’s like a crawly feeling inside,” says Judy*. “You get hot, then chilled, and you feel like you want to run away.” The 57-year-old has short dark-grey hair and a haunted expression. She’s breathless and sits with her right leg balanced up on her walking stick, rocking it back and forth as she speaks.

Judy explains that she suffers from constant, debilitating pain: arthritis, back problems, fibromyalgia and daily migraines. She was a manager at a major electronics company until 2008, but can no longer work. She often hurts too much even to make it out of bed. Continue Reading

Can looking at art make for better doctors?

Author:

(Article published on The Conversation)

In 1984, artist Jon Cattapan’s sister Adriana died in a car accident. His painting, titled Sister, and some accompanying drawings, were a response to this tragedy. Sister depicts a grey-shrouded body lying on a bright red structure. Behind it are five figures in two separate groups. One represents living relatives and friends; the other, the spiritual world.

Sister’s distorted figures reflect Cattapan’s interest in primitivism and animism. Its colours and twisted forms project his anguish, and express the heightened intensity of the state of grieving. Cattapan has written about the disorientation experienced in grieving and also how the “topsy-turvy” space in all the Sister images represents his sister’s schizophrenia.

One day, a few months ago, a group of third year medical students spent a long time looking at these works, which were on display at the Ian Potter Museum of Art at Melbourne University.

They were encouraged by the Museum’s Academic Programs Curator to describe aspects of the painting as objectively as possible – its style, colours, content. Then they began to share their personal interpretations of the narrative.

Jon Cattapan, Sister, 1984 (oil on canvas). The University of Melbourne Art Collection, Gift of Jon Cattapan 2008.

Was the prone figure in the foreground dead or dying? What elements were more powerful? The Christian iconography and emotion on the figures’ faces? Their gestures? The insistent vibrancy of the colours? Or the apparently chaotic mix of formal elements? How did their interpretation change when the examination shifted to the Sister Drawings, hung alongside the painting, which are like snapshots of aspects of the story?

Continue Reading

Resources for Treating Chronic Pain by the Victoria Pain Specialists (Vicpain) …MY pain team!

Author:

Forgive my bossiness but this post comes from a desperate experience that I lived for 4.5 years. That’s a long time for someone with increasing chronic pain levels and not much hope. I felt isolated and alone in a very foreign world without appropriate treatment, compassion and understanding.

Nine years later, I’m hopeful a situation like mine can be prevented with the knowledge provided in the following resources. Vicpain are leaders in pain treatment and management, I can certainly vouch for that!

Please read the resources, learn them, share them… and if you require information on chronic pain, follow Vicpain. Continue Reading

Retrainpain.org

Author:

It’s finally filtering through my brain: It’s going to be VERY hard work most days and it’s up to me to keep my butt in gear and stay on the treatment and management trail.

You’ll all be getting sick of reading my badger about this, but the research is out. Patient experiences have been in the making (for decades now), and the biggest sign that the hard work is cut out for people with chronic pain comes from the many who are now drug dependent with either increasing levels of pain or who sadly have lost their lives – not from the medication – but from the battle.

I get sick of filtering through paragraphs and words and med talk that I don’t quite understand (not to mention the pain levels soar for some peculiar reason) and as an artist, I still find it really difficult to present my pain experience to my readers, family and friends in a simple form.

Continue Reading

Enter your address to receive posts via email

Definitions of pain

What is Pudendal Neuralgia (PN)?
Most simply put PN is Carpal Tunnel in the pelvis/buttocks. Compression of the Pudendal Nerve occurs after trauma to the pelvis and is aggravated with pressure. The pain is often described as a toothache like pain, with spasms, sensations of tingling, numbness, or burning. It can be very debilitating.

What is Neuropathic pain?
Neuropathic pain is the result of an injury or malfunction in the peripheral or central nervous system. The pain is often triggered by an injury, but this injury may or may not involve actual damage to the nervous system. More…

Pain Train my online health record

Pain Train my online health record

Save

Order my book $31 (inc. postage)

Archives