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The Brain That Changes Itself

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The Brain That Changes Itself

The Brain that Changes Itself

Author: Norman Doidg

…The result is this book, a riveting collection of case histories detailing the astonishing progress of people whose conditions had long been dismissed as hopeless. We see a woman born with half a brain that rewired itself to work as a whole, a woman labeled retarded who cured her deficits with brain exercises and now cures those of others, blind people learning to see, learning disorders cured, IQs raised, aging brains rejuvenated, painful phantom limbs erased, stroke patients recovering their faculties, children with cerebral palsy learning to move more gracefully, entrenched depression and anxiety disappearing, and lifelong character traits altered.

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  • Zabrina

    Just got my copy in the mail :-)

  • workcovervictim

    Looks like a very interesting book! Have you read it? I may ask the Easter Bunny for a copy 😉

    • soula

      I definitely read it and that’s where my second stage of repair began. I cam across a paragraph that talked about Dr Lorimer Moseley, our very own clinical scientist investigating pain in humans from SA. I googled and realised I’d heard him on Margaret Throsby and then found quite publicly displayed his email. I took this as an invite, offering myself as a study in exchange for some advice, anything! It blew me away that after everything I’d been through and after so many practitioners had seen ‘soula inside and out’, Lorimer read three paragraphs and replied with something like: ‘tell me where you are and i’ll tell you where to go’… that’s how I found The Women’s Physio department.

      But back to the book, it’s so interesting. Our brain can change. I believe it. I just want mine to hurry up a little…

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